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Win Change window position and size

You can move, resize and overlap windows on screen. Following are the basic movements. If you are not familiar with dragging and dropping, see Win Drag and drop.


MOVE WINDOW AROUND SCREEN
Point to anywhere in the middle of the title bar (top of window) and drag.


RESIZE ENTIRE WINDOW
Point to a corner. When pointer changes to an angled double arrow, drag to new location.


RESIZE ONE SIDE ONLY
Point to a border. When the pointer changes to a double arrow, drag to new location.


TAKE WINDOW OFF SCREEN AND BRING IT BACK
This is called "minimizing" and "restoring." To take the current application off screen, click the leftmost button at the top right side of the window (underscore/dash symbol).

To restore it back to the screen, click the Taskbar button.


MAKE WINDOW COVER ENTIRE SCREEN (MAXIMIZE)
Click the middle button at the top right side of the window (rectangle symbol). The button icon changes to double rectangles after maximizing.


RETURN TO PREVIOUS WINDOW SIZE (RESTORE)
Click the middle button at the top right side of the window (double rectangles). The button icon changes to a single rectangle after restoring.



Win Drag and drop

Files and folders can be copied or moved to another location by literally "dragging" them across the screen. "Drag" means placing the cursor over the icon of an item, pressing the left (or sometimes right) mouse button to highlight it, and while keeping the button depressed, moving the selected item across the screen. "Drop" means releasing the mouse button when the destination is reached. As the icons are dragged, all valid destinations are highlighted. To copy and move files using only the menus, see Win Copy/move files/folders.

Although many Windows applications implement their own drag and drop capabilities, users can copy and move files and folders any time via drag and drop in Explorer (see Win Explorer), as follows:


Drag and Drop - Right Button - Copy or Move
Dragging the icons with the right mouse button
is the more cautious method because you are
prompted to either Copy or Move when you drop
the files/folders.


Drag and Drop - Left Button - Automatic
Dragging with the left mouse button is faster
because you are not prompted when you drop.
Depending on whether the source files are local
(on this same machine) or coming from a remote
machine determines whether they are copied or
moved. Note the following actions:

                Action       File at
     Coming     Taken when   Original
     From       Dropped      Location

     Local      Move         Not there

     Remote     Copy         Still there


Drag and Drop - Left Button - Copy Only
Dragging with the left mouse button and holding
the Ctrl key down while dragging copies the
files and folders without a prompt.






The Destination Folder Responds
This shows three files dragged to the Work folder with the left mouse button. In Win7, 8.1 and 10 (top), the destination folder name is spelled out, whereas with XP (bottom), one has to be attentive to which folder "lights up. To highlight multiple files, see Win Highlighting items.






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Before/After Your Search Term
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Win 9xWin Change Windows appearance
Win 9x/3.1 DifferencesWin Character Map
Win 9x interfaceWin Clipboard
Win abc'sWin Computer
Win Active title barWin Configuration settings
Win Add protocolWin Control panels
Win All ProgramsWin Copy between windows
Win Associating filesWin Copy/move files/folders
Win Auto Hide TaskbarWin Create new folder
Win AutoRunWin Desktop search

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